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  • Archive for the 'Holidays' Category

    A Christmas Reading From Thomas Pynchon

    Posted by David Foster on 24th December 2019 (All posts by )

    I’ve always liked this passage from Thomas Pynchon’s great novelGravity’s Rainbow.

    The setting: it is the grim winter of 1944, just before Christmas. The military situation in Europe is not good, and WWII seems as if it will never end. London is under attack by V-2 rockets and V-1 cruise missiles (as they would be called today.) Roger and Jessica, two of the main characters, are driving in a rural area in England and come upon a church where carols are being sung. They decide to go inside.

    They walked through the tracks of all the others in the snow, she gravely on his arm, wind blowing her hair to snarls, heels slipping once on ice. “To hear the music,” he explained.

    Tonight’s scratch choir was all male, epauletted shoulders visible under the wide necks of white robes, and many faces nearly as white with the exhaustion of soaked and muddy fields, midwatches, cables strummed by the nervous balloons sunfishing in the clouds, tents whose lights inside shone nuclear at twilight, soullike, through the cross-hatched walls, turning canvas to fine gauze, while the wind drummed there…..The children are away dreaming, but the Empire has no place for dreams and it’s Adults Only in here tonight, here in this refuge with the lamps burning deep, in pre-Cambrian exhalation, savory as food cooking, heavy as soot. And 60 miles up the rockets hanging the measureless instant over the black North Sea before the fall, ever faster, to orange heat, Christmas star, in helpless plunge to Earth. Lower in the sky the flying bombs are out too, roaring like the Adversary, seeking whom they may devour. It’s a long walk 500vip彩票安卓下载官网 tonight. Listen to this mock-angel singing, let you500vip彩票安卓下载官网r communion be at least in listening, even if they are not spokesmen for you500vip彩票安卓下载官网r exact hopes, you500vip彩票安卓下载官网r exact, darkest terror, listen. There must have been evensong here long before the news of Christ. Surely for as long as there have been nights bad as this one–something to raise the possibility of another night that could actually, with love and cockcrows, light the path 500vip彩票安卓下载官网, banish the Adversary, destroy the boundaries between our lands, our bodies, our stories, all false, about who we are: for the one night, leaving only the clear way 500vip彩票安卓下载官网 and the memory of the infant you500vip彩票安卓下载官网 saw, almost too frail, there’s too much shit in these streets, camels and other beasts stir heavily outside, each hoof a chance to wipe him out…….But on the way 500vip彩票安卓下载官网 tonight, you500vip彩票安卓下载官网 wish you500vip彩票安卓下载官网’d picked him up, held him a bit. Just held him, very close to you500vip彩票安卓下载官网r heart, his cheek by the hollow of you500vip彩票安卓下载官网r shoulder, full of sleep. As if it were you500vip彩票安卓下载官网 who could, somehow, save him. For the moment not caring who you500vip彩票安卓下载官网’re supposed to be registered as. For the moment, anyway, no longer who the Caesars say you500vip彩票安卓下载官网 are.

    O Jesu parvule
    Nach dir is mir so weh…

    So this pickup group, these exiles and horny kids, sullen civilians called up in their middle age…….give you500vip彩票安卓下载官网 this evensong, climaxing now with its rising fragment of some ancient scale, voices overlapping three and fourfold, filling the entire hollow of the church–no counterfeit baby, no announcement of the Kingdom, not even a try at warming or lighting this terrible night, only, damn us, our scruffy obligatory little cry, our maximum reach outward–praise be to God!–for you500vip彩票安卓下载官网 to take back to you500vip彩票安卓下载官网r war-address, you500vip彩票安卓下载官网r war-identity, across the snow’s footprints and tire tracks finally to the path you500vip彩票安卓下载官网 must create by you500vip彩票安卓下载官网rself, alone in the dark. Whether you500vip彩票安卓下载官网 want it or not, whatever seas you500vip彩票安卓下载官网 have crossed, the way 500vip彩票安卓下载官网…

    Posted in Christianity, History, Holidays, War and Peace | 8 Comments »

    New Year’s Eve

    Posted by David Foster on 31st December 2018 (All posts by )

    Posted in Deep Thoughts, Holidays | 19 Comments »

    Christmas 2018

    Posted by David Foster on 24th December 2018 (All posts by )

    isan ancient structure in Ireland so constructed that the sun, at the exact time of the winter solstice, shines directly down a long corridor and illuminates the inner chamber. More about Newgrangeand.

    has an Arthurian passage about the Solstice.

    Don Sensing has thoughts astronomical, historical, and theological about.

    , from Maggie’s Farm

    …link came from the great and much-mournedNeptunus Lex

    , from Cal Tech. Lots of great photos

    , from King’s College Cambridge

    has some thoughts on the season. More.

    Thefirst radio broadcast of voice and musictook place on Christmas Eve, 1906.(although there is debate about the historical veracity of this story)

    An air traffic control version of

    O Come, O Come, Emmanuel, sung by

    Margaret Soltan writes about

    A Christmas-appropriate poem from Rudyard Kipling

    Read the rest of this entry »

    Posted in Christianity, Holidays, Poetry | 6 Comments »

    Dross to Gold and Vice Versa

    Posted by on 7th December 2018 (All posts by )

    I was skimming through the various stories about the late President Bush the First this week, especially one about how he and Barbara were so considerate of and beloved by the Security Service agents who guarded them. It was kind of sweet, the going through the White House kitchen in the wee hours, looking for the cookies that he knew that the stewards of the kitchen had baked for the next day … and being joined by Bush the First, in ransacking the kitchen in search of the elusive cookies. That Bush the First and Barbara were loved and respected by the agents whose mission I can attest to at second hand. One of the Air Force security service NCOs I served with in Korea had just come off an assignment at the White House protection detachment. He adored Barbara, BTW – to hear him tell it, he was one of her favorite agents. She called him “Timmy”, which was kind of cute, as he was one of these six-foot-something guys and built like a concrete traffic bollard; probably Barbara was the only one aside from his mother who called him by that name. Read the rest of this entry »

    Posted in Conservatism, History, Holidays, Obama | 6 Comments »

    Santa Arrives, Texas-Style

    Posted by on 2nd December 2018 (All posts by )

    Merry Christmas, ho, ho, ho, y’all!

    Posted in Americas, Holidays, Photos | 10 Comments »

    ‘Tis the Season

    Posted by on 29th November 2018 (All posts by )

    The season to go all out in shopping for Christmas now that Thanksgiving is diminishing in the holiday rear-view mirror, all but the turkey leftovers. Such has never really been the habit of sensible people like myself and the Daughter Unit, although we have been known to indulge in considerable bargain-foraging. Not in a mall or a big-box store, however, and certainly not in the wee hours of Black Friday morning, amid a mob waiting for the doors to open. Frankly, I can’t imagine wanting anything so badly as to indulge in unseemly fisticuffs or getting out of a warm bed at 2 AM in order to stand in the freezing dark for two or three hours just for the chance purchase it. We are civilized people, and civilized people have much more efficient ways to organize Christmas presents for our nearest and dearest. Read the rest of this entry »

    Posted in Americas, Holidays, Marketing, Texas, USA | 4 Comments »

    Shall It Be Sustained?

    Posted by David Foster on 4th July 2018 (All posts by )

    For the 4th of July of 2014, had an excellent post: .I recommend the entire post and all the links; read especially the third linked essay, which Cass wrote in 2008: .

    For the last several years, on July 4th I’ve posted an excerpt from Stephen Vincent Benet’s poemListen to the People. The title I’ve used for these posts prior to 2013 wasIt Shall Be Sustained, which is from the last line of Benet’s poem.

    Narrator:

    This is Independence Day,
    Fourth of July, the day we mean to keep,
    Whatever happens and whatever falls
    Out of a sky grown strange;
    This is firecracker day for sunburnt kids,
    The day of the parade,
    Slambanging down the street.
    Listen to the parade!
    There’s J. K. Burney’s float,
    Red-white-and-blue crepe-paper on the wheels,
    The Fire Department and the local Grange,
    There are the pretty girls with their hair curled
    Who represent the Thirteen Colonies,
    The Spirit of East Greenwich, Betsy Ross,
    Democracy, or just some pretty girls.
    There are the veterans and the Legion Post
    (Their feet are going to hurt when they get 500vip彩票安卓下载官网),
    The band, the flag, the band, the usual crowd,
    Good-humored, watching, hot,
    Silent a second as the flag goes by,
    Kidding the local cop and eating popsicles,
    Jack Brown and Rosie Shapiro and Dan Shay,
    Paul Bunchick and the Greek who runs the Greek’s,
    The black-eyed children out of Sicily,
    The girls who giggle and the boys who push,
    All of them there and all of them a nation.
    And, afterwards,
    There’ll be ice-cream and fireworks and a speech
    By somebody the Honorable Who,
    The lovers will pair off in the kind dark
    And Tessie Jones, our honor-graduate,
    Will read the declaration.
    That’s how it is. It’s always been that way.
    That’s our Fourth of July, through war and peace,
    That’s our fourth of July.

    And a lean farmer on a stony farm
    Came 500vip彩票安卓下载官网 from mowing, buttoned up his shirt
    And walked ten miles to town.
    Musket in hand.
    He didn’t know the sky was falling down
    And, it may be, he didn’t know so much.
    But people oughtn’t to be pushed around
    By kings or any such.
    A workman in the city dropped his tools.
    An ordinary, small-town kind of man
    Found himself standing in the April sun,
    One of a ragged line
    Against the skilled professionals of war,
    The matchless infantry who could not fail,
    Not for the profit, not to conquer worlds,
    Not for the pomp or the heroic tale
    But first, and principally, since he was sore.
    They could do things in quite a lot of places.
    They shouldn’t do them here, in Lexington.

    He looked around and saw his neighbors’ faces

    The poem is very long, and is worth reading in full. The full text was published in Life Magazine; it is online. The Life text may be a little difficult to read; I posted an excerpt which is considerably longer than the abovehere.

    Benet’s poem ends with these words:

    We made it and we make it and it’s ours
    We shall maintain it. It shall be sustained

    But shall it?

    Posted in History, Holidays, Poetry, USA | 6 Comments »

    In the Presence of Mine Enemies

    Posted by on 27th May 2018 (All posts by )

    This week, I happened on a movie – from a couple of years back. The movie starred Helen Mirren, who vanished so utterly into the part of an elderly Viennese Jewish refugee, Maria Altmann, that there was no trace of Helen Mirren visible – the way that good acting should be, but rarely is. Briefly, the movie concerned Maria Altmann’s epic legal quest to have a famous and insanely valuable portrait of her painted in by Gustav Klimt in the early years of the twentieth century – a painting which had been looted by the Nazis – returned to her. The painting gravitated into the , from which it was eventually pried by dint of persistent and effective legal action. A decent movie overall, BTW. But what struck me in watching it was how much the mannerisms, the accent, the character of Maria Altmann reminded me of a certain family friend, a woman of the same vintage, and similar background; Viennese, of a prosperous family who also ran afoul of the Nazis, and finished up living in Southern California. I wonder if Lainie and Maria Altmann knew each other, back in the day? Lainie lived in the right part of town and had the kind of income and background to have patronized Maria Altmann’s upscale boutique. Never know now, I guess. But I sought out the text of an early post on Sgt. Stryker that I wrote about Lainie’s rescuing angel. Read the rest of this entry »

    Posted in Blogging, Civil Society, Deep Thoughts, Holidays | 7 Comments »

    History Friday: The Most Incredible Round the World Air Journey

    Posted by on 11th May 2018 (All posts by )

    OK, so it was linked on Insty, but this was an incredible read: of the Pan-Am commercial flight which got caught on the wrong side of the world after Pearl Harbor, and had to go around the long way to get 500vip彩票安卓下载官网 again, with pluck, luck and sheer stubborn inventiveness.



    Enjoy!
    I particularly liked the part where they visited a public library, searching for relevant information.

    Posted in Anglosphere, Holidays | 2 Comments »

    Posted by Jonathan on 5th May 2018 (All posts by )

    cinco mayos

    Chicagoboyz celebrate Cinco de Mayo.

    UPDATE: , via commenter Gringo.

    Posted in Holidays, Humor | 9 Comments »

    Holiday Wishes

    Posted by Jonathan on 24th December 2017 (All posts by )

    May all members of the Chicago Boyz community enjoy a very merry Christmas and a happy and healthy 2018.

    Posted in Holidays | 4 Comments »

    Nostalgia Post: Heirloom Dishes

    Posted by on 22nd November 2017 (All posts by )

    (This essay was originally written more than ten years ago, and is included in the ebook ; a reminiscence even then of what Thanksgiving was before I left 500vip彩票安卓下载官网 to join the Air Force. I think I was 500vip彩票安卓下载官网 with my family for that holiday perhaps four or five years since then. Dad passed away in 2010, Mom is a semi-invalid living with my sister and her family. I don’t know if my sister ever fixes the onions in cheese sauce – I certainly don’t.)

    Fairly early on, Mom and Dad reached a compromise on the question of where the holidays of Thanksgiving and Christmas would be celebrated: Christmas at our house, and Thanksgiving alternating between the grandparents’ houses: One year at Grannie Jessie and Grandpa Jim’s little white house on South Lotus, the next at Grannie Dodie and Grandpa Al’s in Camarillo. Since Dad was an only child, and Mom an only surviving child, all the hopes of constellation of childless or unmarried great-aunts and uncles were centered on JP, Pippy, Sander and I. We rather basked in the undivided attention, even as we regretted the lack of first cousins; there was Great-Aunt Nan, who was Grandpa Al’s you500vip彩票安卓下载官网nger sister, and Grannie Dodie’s two brothers, Fred and Bob. Fred had been a sailor on a real sailing ship in his you500vip彩票安卓下载官网th and had lady in a frilly skirt tattooed on each forearm, who did the shimmy when he flexed his muscles: he also had children, so he was not invariably with us every Thanksgiving. Great-Uncle Bob was married to Great-Aunt Rose, and her sister Nita lived with them. Rose was frail and genteel, and her sister Nita plump and bossy, but they both had neatly marcelled short hair, in the fashion of the 1920ies, and both smelt deliciously of flower-scented dusting powder when hugged.

    The menu was unvaryingly traditional, no matter if the table was laid out in the screened porch at Grannie Jessie’s, or set up in Grannie Dodie’s dining room and living room. Both of our grandmothers followed pretty much the same recipes for the turkey and bread stuffing, the giblet gravy and mashed potatoes with plenty of milk and butter whipped in. Both of them preferred opening a can of jellied cranberry sauce and letting it schlorp out onto a cut-glass plate, the ripples from the can unashamedly displayed to the world; at Christmas, Mom went as far as making cranberry sauce from a bag of sour fresh cranberries boiled together with sugar, but as far as the grandmothers were concerned, there was a reason that God had invented canned cranberry sauce technology.
    Read the rest of this entry »

    Posted in Diversions, Holidays, Human Behavior, Humor | 6 Comments »

    Shall It Be Sustained?

    Posted by David Foster on 4th July 2017 (All posts by )

    For the 4th of July of 2014, had an excellent post: .I recommend the entire post and all the links; read especially the third linked essay, which Cass wrote in 2008: .

    For the last several years, on July 4th I’ve posted an excerpt from Stephen Vincent Benet’s poemListen to the People. The title I’ve used for these posts prior to 2013 wasIt Shall Be Sustained, which is from the last line of Benet’s poem.

    Narrator:

    This is Independence Day,
    Fourth of July, the day we mean to keep,
    Whatever happens and whatever falls
    Out of a sky grown strange;
    This is firecracker day for sunburnt kids,
    The day of the parade,
    Slambanging down the street.
    Listen to the parade!
    There’s J. K. Burney’s float,
    Red-white-and-blue crepe-paper on the wheels,
    The Fire Department and the local Grange,
    There are the pretty girls with their hair curled
    Who represent the Thirteen Colonies,
    The Spirit of East Greenwich, Betsy Ross,
    Democracy, or just some pretty girls.
    There are the veterans and the Legion Post
    (Their feet are going to hurt when they get 500vip彩票安卓下载官网),
    The band, the flag, the band, the usual crowd,
    Good-humored, watching, hot,
    Silent a second as the flag goes by,
    Kidding the local cop and eating popsicles,
    Jack Brown and Rosie Shapiro and Dan Shay,
    Paul Bunchick and the Greek who runs the Greek’s,
    The black-eyed children out of Sicily,
    The girls who giggle and the boys who push,
    All of them there and all of them a nation.
    And, afterwards,
    There’ll be ice-cream and fireworks and a speech
    By somebody the Honorable Who,
    The lovers will pair off in the kind dark
    And Tessie Jones, our honor-graduate,
    Will read the declaration.
    That’s how it is. It’s always been that way.
    That’s our Fourth of July, through war and peace,
    That’s our fourth of July.

    And a lean farmer on a stony farm
    Came 500vip彩票安卓下载官网 from mowing, buttoned up his shirt
    And walked ten miles to town.
    Musket in hand.
    He didn’t know the sky was falling down
    And, it may be, he didn’t know so much.
    But people oughtn’t to be pushed around
    By kings or any such.
    A workman in the city dropped his tools.
    An ordinary, small-town kind of man
    Found himself standing in the April sun,
    One of a ragged line
    Against the skilled professionals of war,
    The matchless infantry who could not fail,
    Not for the profit, not to conquer worlds,
    Not for the pomp or the heroic tale
    But first, and principally, since he was sore.
    They could do things in quite a lot of places.
    They shouldn’t do them here, in Lexington.

    He looked around and saw his neighbors’ faces

    The poem is very long, and is worth reading in full. The full text was published in Life Magazine; it is online. The Life text may be a little difficult to read; I posted an excerpt which is considerably longer than the abovehere.

    Benet’s poem ends with these words:

    We made it and we make it and it’s ours
    We shall maintain it. It shall be sustained

    But shall it?

    Posted in History, Holidays, USA | 3 Comments »

    How Long?

    Posted by on 27th December 2016 (All posts by )

    Hail, thou ever blessed morn,
    Hail redemption’s happy dawn,
    Sing through all Jerusalem,
    Christ is born in Bethlehem.
    Edward Caswall, 1858 – Hymn for Christmas Day (Also known as See Amid the Winter Snow)

    I have a deep and abiding fondness for certain choral music; Christmas carols or even sort-of-Christmas carols, especially the English ones which weren’t part of my growing-up-Lutheran tradition. That tradition tended more towards the Germanic side of the scale, save for hymns by the Wesleys and Isaac Watts. The English Victorians … sufficient to say that a lot of such hymns and carols were pretty ghastly as poetry, music and theology combined, but time has done some sifting out and the best of them usually turn up in seasonal presentations like the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols from Kings’ College, Cambridge. I make a point of listening to the BBC broadcast of it, every year on Christmas Eve morning. I’ve become so very fond of some carols I’ve heard through that broadcast that I’ve made a point of searching out YouTube recordings of them to post on my various websites. All In the Bleak Midwinter is one, Once in David’s Royal City is another – and See Amid the Winter Snow is another still. () I’ve replayed the video so often in the last few days, I have finally learned the melody by heart … and the chorus haunts me this particular Christmas. Sing through all Jerusalem, Christ is born in Bethlehem!

    It’s not just that the UN has resolved, in the face of an abstention by the US, to back a claim by the Palestinians to Jerusalem, or that a Jewish infant born in Bethlehem these days might be a hate crime in progress according to pro-Palestine activists. Once a town largely Christian, most local Christians have been chased out, just as Jews and Christians have been from practically everywhere else in the Islamic world. Well, that’s the Middle East for you500vip彩票安卓下载官网, everywhere outside of Israel. The ethnic-cleansing of everyone but Muslims of whatever flavor goes on, unabated in the Middle East accompanied by a chorus of indifference sung by the Western ruling class, who seem intent on an Olympic-qualification level of virtue-signaling.
    Read the rest of this entry »

    Posted in Christianity, Civil Liberties, Civil Society, Current Events, Europe, France, Germany, Holidays, Immigration, Islam, Middle East, Religion, Terrorism | 50 Comments »

    Christmas 2016

    Posted by David Foster on 24th December 2016 (All posts by )

    isan ancient structure in Ireland so constructed that the sun, at the exact time of the winter solstice, shines directly down a long corridor and illuminates the inner chamber. More about Newgrangeand.

    has an Arthurian passage about the Solstice.

    Don Sensing has thoughts astronomical, historical, and theological about.

    , from Maggie’s Farm

    …link came from the great and much-mournedNeptunus Lex

    , from Cal Tech. Lots of great photos

    , from King’s College Cambridge

    has some thoughts on the season. More.

    A Christmas reading from.

    Thefirst radio broadcast of voice and musictook place on Christmas Eve, 1906.(although there is debate about the historical veracity of this story)

    An air traffic control version of

    from the St Paul winter carnival

    O Come, O Come, Emmanuel, sung by

    Margaret Soltan writes about

    A Christmas-appropriate poem from Rudyard Kipling

    Mona Charen, who is Jewish, wonders

    Posted in Christianity, Holidays, Poetry | 2 Comments »

    Seth Barrett Tillman: Armistice/Veterans Day Post and Summary of State & Local Election Results

    Posted by Jonathan on 11th November 2016 (All posts by )

    Posted in Anglosphere, Civil Society, Culture, Elections, History, Holidays, Politics, USA | Comments Off on Seth Barrett Tillman: Armistice/Veterans Day Post and Summary of State & Local Election Results

    5777

    Posted by Jonathan on 2nd October 2016 (All posts by )

    – Shana Tova. Wishing a sweet and healthy year to all.

    Shana Tova

    Posted in Holidays, Judaism | 3 Comments »

    “Obama rips ‘bigotry’ and ‘xenophobia’ with Ramadan message”

    Posted by Jonathan on 7th July 2016 (All posts by )

    :

    President Barack Obama sent a message to Donald Trump on Wednesday in a statement marking the end of Ramadan, calling on Americans to renew their commitment to protecting Muslim Americans against bigotry and xenophobia.

    Obama seems to want to teach Americans to like Islam whether they want to or not.

    Nancy Reagan famously said “Kinder than who?” in response to GHW Bush’s “kinder, gentler nation” remark in his 1988 RNC acceptance speech. In Obama’s case we might ask, “Bigotry and xenophobia” from whom? That’s a rhetorical question, BTW.

    (Via .)

    Posted in Holidays, Islam, Obama, Quotations, USA | 14 Comments »

    Shall It Be Sustained?

    Posted by David Foster on 4th July 2016 (All posts by )

    For the 4th of July of 2014, had an excellent post: .I recommend the entire post and all the links; read especially the third linked essay, which Cass wrote in 2008: .

    For the last several years, on July 4th I’ve posted an excerpt from Stephen Vincent Benet’s poemListen to the People. The title I’ve used for these posts prior to 2013 wasIt Shall Be Sustained, which is from the last line of Benet’s poem.

    Narrator:

    This is Independence Day,
    Fourth of July, the day we mean to keep,
    Whatever happens and whatever falls
    Out of a sky grown strange;
    This is firecracker day for sunburnt kids,
    The day of the parade,
    Slambanging down the street.
    Listen to the parade!
    There’s J. K. Burney’s float,
    Red-white-and-blue crepe-paper on the wheels,
    The Fire Department and the local Grange,
    There are the pretty girls with their hair curled
    Who represent the Thirteen Colonies,
    The Spirit of East Greenwich, Betsy Ross,
    Democracy, or just some pretty girls.
    There are the veterans and the Legion Post
    (Their feet are going to hurt when they get 500vip彩票安卓下载官网),
    The band, the flag, the band, the usual crowd,
    Good-humored, watching, hot,
    Silent a second as the flag goes by,
    Kidding the local cop and eating popsicles,
    Jack Brown and Rosie Shapiro and Dan Shay,
    Paul Bunchick and the Greek who runs the Greek’s,
    The black-eyed children out of Sicily,
    The girls who giggle and the boys who push,
    All of them there and all of them a nation.
    And, afterwards,
    There’ll be ice-cream and fireworks and a speech
    By somebody the Honorable Who,
    The lovers will pair off in the kind dark
    And Tessie Jones, our honor-graduate,
    Will read the declaration.
    That’s how it is. It’s always been that way.
    That’s our Fourth of July, through war and peace,
    That’s our fourth of July.

    And a lean farmer on a stony farm
    Came 500vip彩票安卓下载官网 from mowing, buttoned up his shirt
    And walked ten miles to town.
    Musket in hand.
    He didn’t know the sky was falling down
    And, it may be, he didn’t know so much.
    But people oughtn’t to be pushed around
    By kings or any such.
    A workman in the city dropped his tools.
    An ordinary, small-town kind of man
    Found himself standing in the April sun,
    One of a ragged line
    Against the skilled professionals of war,
    The matchless infantry who could not fail,
    Not for the profit, not to conquer worlds,
    Not for the pomp or the heroic tale
    But first, and principally, since he was sore.
    They could do things in quite a lot of places.
    They shouldn’t do them here, in Lexington.

    He looked around and saw his neighbors’ faces

    The poem is very long, and is worth reading in full. The full text was published in Life Magazine; it is online. The Life text may be a little difficult to read; I posted an excerpt which is considerably longer than the abovehere.

    Benet’s poem ends with these words:

    We made it and we make it and it’s ours
    We shall maintain it. It shall be sustained

    But shall it?

    Posted in History, Holidays, USA | 11 Comments »

    Memorial Day 2016

    Posted by David Foster on 29th May 2016 (All posts by )

    A powerful and beautifully-done music video:

    Neptunus Lex:

    Also from Lex:

    Update: for this year is up at her site

     

    Posted in History, Holidays, USA, War and Peace | 23 Comments »

    Memorial Day in Luna City

    Posted by on 29th May 2016 (All posts by )

    (A brief account of Memorial Day in Luna city, from the , which we brought out at the beginning of May, in response to a chorus of pleading from readers who want to know how the cliffhanger at the end of the was resolved.)

    Luna City is well-equipped with military veterans, as are many small towns in fly-over country – especially the old South. The draft is only somewhat responsible for this. After all, it was ended formally more than four decades past. But the habit and tradition of volunteering for military service continues down to this very day, with the result that veterans of various services and eras are thick on the ground in Luna City – while a good few continue as reservists. There are not very many pensioned retirees, though; Clovis Walcott is one of those few, having made a solid Army career in the Corps of Engineers, and then in the same capacity as a Reservist. He is the exception; Lunaites mostly have served a single hitch or two, or for the duration of a wartime mobilization. They come 500vip彩票安卓下载官网, pick up those threads of the life they put aside, or weave together the tapestry of a new one. What they did when they were in the military most usually lies lightly on them, sometimes only as skin-deep as a tattoo … and sometimes as deep as a scar.
    Read the rest of this entry »

    Posted in Book Notes, Civil Society, Current Events, Diversions, Holidays | Comments Off on Memorial Day in Luna City

    Memorial Day

    Posted by Nathaniel T. Lauterbach on 27th May 2016 (All posts by )

    Today I drove through the gate at the nearby Marine Corps base. The you500vip彩票安卓下载官网ng Lance Corporal who was faithfully executing his General Orders at the gate checked my ID card, saluted smartly, and wished me a “happy holiday weekend.” I’m not sure I can have that, frankly, for the similar reason that a devout Christian may think it strange to be wished a “Happy Easter.” It just doesn’t make sense when you500vip彩票安卓下载官网 examine what those holidays are about.

    To me Memorial Day is intensely personal. I’ve had varying levels of a relationship with 15 Marines and Sailors who have paid the ultimate sacrifice for our country. Most of these men lost their lives in combat, but some lost their lives training for combat, too. Their deaths are still tragic–they were undertaking essentially the same tasks, doing dangerous work, and for the same ultimate goal.

    Their names are:

    Wroblewski.
    Strom.
    Crist.
    Yaggy.
    Palmer.
    Weis.
    Carazo.
    Cook.
    Claiborne.
    Quin.
    Parker.
    McHone.
    Budrejko.
    Bland.
    Wermers.

    Most of these guys are aviators. One was a UH-1 crew chief that I flew in combat with on dozens of occasions. I overflew over the wreckage which contained the remains of two of the pilots back in July, 2010. One of the 15 was a tank officer. Two were infantry officers. One was a special operations officer. One was a C2 officer. One of them was my “On-Wing” going through flight school (which means that he was the pilot who taught me how to fly).

    15 irreplaceable lives.

    I think about these men every day, but especially so on Memorial Day.

    I hate this holiday–every second of it. I hope you500vip彩票安卓下载官网 hate it too. Happy Memorial Day–my ass.

    Semper Fi, gents. Til Valhalla.

    Posted in Holidays, Military Affairs, Personal Narrative, USA, War and Peace | 11 Comments »

    The Things That We Are Asked To Give Up

    Posted by on 30th March 2016 (All posts by )

    So, as I am devoting all my energy and time to finishing the first draft of another book, I have been following – with lashings of sorrow, pity, dread and the merest splash of schadenfreude – developments in Europe. Germany, which seems to be cracking under the weight of a full load of so-called refugees, Sweden, ditto, Brussels, where the concerned citizens appear to be too frightened to continue with a protest march against fear, and the governing authorities appear to be more concerned about the legendary anti-Muslim backlash than the certainty of Islamic terror unleashed in some European or English city. Read the rest of this entry »

    Posted in Britain, Civil Liberties, Civil Society, Current Events, France, Germany, Holidays, International Affairs, Islam, Predictions, Religion | 23 Comments »

    Rerun: “Cologne, Rape, and ‘Purim & My Bangladeshi Friend'”

    Posted by Jonathan on 23rd February 2016 (All posts by )

    :

    I wrote and published this 8-page short story–Purim & My Bangladeshi Friend–a little while back. As I said, today is Purim, and it’s Purim again in a month. So my short story is, I think, once again, timely, and sadly, once again, all too relevant to life in our shared West, in our shared modernity.

    Seth’s story is .

    (Today’s post is a rerun because Lex wrote a post about Seth’s story a couple of years ago. Lex’s post is still worth reading.)

    Posted in Deep Thoughts, Europe, History, Holidays, Human Behavior, Islam, Judaism | 1 Comment »

    New Year’s Eve

    Posted by David Foster on 31st December 2015 (All posts by )

    A thought from the late and very great Neptunus Lex:

    “I’ve often wished that you500vip彩票安卓下载官网 could split at each important choice in life. Go both ways, each time a fork in the road came up. Compare notes at the end, those of us that made it to the clearing at the end of the path. Tell it all over a tumbler of smokey, single malt.”

    Posted in Deep Thoughts, Holidays | 10 Comments »

     

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